Monthly Archives: August 2020

Capitalize On The Benefits of Online Education

Innovation and technology has added ease and convenience to the lives of people. Advancements in computer technology and internet-based online education have proved to be a boon for anyone who seeks learning. It has been especially beneficial for professionals who intend to add to their knowledge and skills, but face limitations due to time and fixed schedules. Middle-aged people at times feel shy about attending college or apprehensive about leaving a well-paying job in order to advance their qualification and add to their count of degrees and skills. Online education comes to their rescue, by freeing them of all these limitations. Instead of attending full time classes and completing the course in fixed time, online education opens up a myriad of options and opportunities.

The concept behind online teaching is simple! It is a way by which training and knowledge is imparted by the medium of internet. The concept is gaining popularity and is quickly becoming the new fad with people of all ages. The main reason fueling its popularity is the fact that one does not face the issues of predefined and fixed time schedules, duration and exam patterns. The study material and course structure is easily customized to serve the interests of the candidates. What is even more lucrative for students who take up online education is the fact that the restrictions due to place are done away with. One can take a professional course accredited by a highly reputed university or institute and earn a degree of equal importance as the in-campus degree – all from the comfort of your home! With the travelling expenses, the living on-campus expenses, and all the additional fees levied by educational institutes being cut, an online degree costs only a fraction of the amount that one generally needs to shell out for an on-campus degree.

The online programs are designed keeping the trends and requirements of professionals in mind. While an on-campus degree requires a person to spend two or more years in the campus, online programs are generally one-year programs. The class schedules for the group taking a course together is generally set up by the group mates themselves, keeping in mind the comfort of every member of the group. This helps participants to conveniently fix their study hours and make adjustments in their busy schedules. The class schedules and study material is available online and can be accessed from anywhere, and at any time.

Moreover, one meets a number of like-minded individuals in an online study group. This helps forge lasting work relations, share knowledge and experience and receive insightful peer group learning. Advancing one’s knowledge in the field where he / she works helps climb the corporate ladder. In fact, an online course helps you jump on the freeway to a successful career!

Succeed In Writing Assignments Through Online Custom Writing Services

Paper writing services are the ultimate solution in helping to save time while trying to meet various deadlines. This service is perfect for students who understand the concept of writing but don’t have time to do it. All custom writing service companies are always updated on format developments and popular topics that are happening around us. They will work according to the concept desired by students. Usually, custom writing companies for students not only provide paper writing but also other types, such as writing for dissertations, theses, bibliographies, articles, case studies, research papers, speech texts, etc.

What should you prepare before using custom writing services? First of all, make sure you have this service online and have an email. The online custom writing service will ask several things related to your paper assignment such as topic, type of paper, number of words, number of pages, required citations, time period, etc. All communication and file transmission is usually done via email. Once they have all the data they want, the company will assign a professional writer to complete your paper assignment.

The advantage of online custom writing services is that you can select a specific author directly, for higher resources you have to pay higher costs as well. The cost you pay is proportional to the paper quality. You have to be careful with services that offer very low rates beyond normal prices. Any service for a very low rate can transfer the job to people with poor writing skills. This is very detrimental to you, right? Therefore, make sure you get a guarantee that all works are plagiarism-free, unique, and original.

If you think you are a bad person at writing papers then it is highly recommended to use online custom writing services. Why is that? Well, because you will avoid punishment and bad grades from your teacher or lecturer. Papers are an important task to improve student’s grades; this task is difficult if students do not have the ability and good understanding of the writing concept. To solve this problem, paper and essay writing companies are here to provide a solution. They will also help in writing assignments in college; they prevent you from scoring below average due to lack of time and lack of understanding of basic concepts in writing.

International students will benefit from online custom writing. College essay assignments are more complicated and difficult; Special skills are needed in completing all essay assignments, you need to conduct surveys, analyze data, determine a strong theoretical basis, determine hypotheses, write correct bibliography, determine the appropriate research method, and much more. In addition to determining the score, writing an essay like a thesis or dissertation is the main requirement in graduating students from a college.

There are many custom writing services on the internet. They are a professional company that understands the needs of students and college students. Their websites are designed to be easily accessible to help anyone interested in quality and original academic texts.

Carbon NanoTube Material for Submarine Hulls and Undersea Colonies?

There was once a Navy Scientist who wished to design and build a US Navy fleet of submarines out of glass. Of course these subs would not be made of your typical household glass. Perhaps a metal type glass, which could withstand the pressure or carbon nano-tube sheets, which I have thought of myself. I can remember some Sci-Fi writers discussing underwater villages of aliens under the sea with clear construction materials, fun stuff to think about indeed. Yet we are now entering a age of new materials which where it may actually be possible, even likely that humans will attempt to build such things. Colonies under the sea, you see?

Perhaps we could design vortex flows to keep the pressure off the surfaces of the hull of the sub or undersea colony. Indeed, vortex creation would pull water away from the surface; movement maybe required at all times to use this principle for submarines. And you would need to put the underwater colony in relative fast moving underwater flows with vortex creation apparatuses up wind of the structure to get the water swirling. A simple fixed formation could accomplish this.

For submarines the blowing of air bubbles out as it moves might also be incorporated into the process to decrease hull pressure, which would also increase speed. Perhaps adding a wave energy wave creation feature when using materials such as carbon nano-tubes might be used since making the surface electrified would be easy. If we used such a concept also special coatings, which provide a gel formation around the boundary layer could be used as well. I bet there are 20 ways to do this really? And so we need to invest more research monies in exploring the mastering of the seas. Think on this in 2006.

Video Games and Theories of Learning: Spotlight on JP Gee and Howard Gardner

Plenty of people in all stages of their lives are fascinated by video games. The games practice can be long, difficult, and challenging, yet the players consider it fun and inspiring. It is hard not to admit that playing games has social and cultural significance in our society. According to J. P. Gee (2003), there are learning principles (LP) that are built into good video games. But these principles do not necessarily boost learning. Several factors are necessary for learning to occur in games and perhaps develop intelligences in the semiotic domain of the daily life. Gee teaches that there are thirty-six learning principles possible to be found and developed in games.

To explain this, Gee defines games as semiotic domain (SD), which, in turn, is part of the wider SD of everyday life. So to speak, a SD is a certain division of the world (whether a location, practice, field of study, etc.) and it can encompass sub-domains. For instance, first and third-person shooter games are a well-defined sub-domain of the games SD. By introducing the concept of SD to games studies, Gee gives us examples of SD like rap, modernist paintings and games of the genre first person shooter. Gee believes that to achieve learning from a SD is necessary three things: 1) learn to experience the world in different ways, 2) learn to form affiliations with members of the SD, and 3) learn how to gain the necessary resources for future learning and problem solving in the domain, as well as in related domains. As we can see, Gee seeks to approximate games to a broader definition of literacy that involves different types of “visual literacy.” Following this notion of literacy, people are literate in a domain only if they are able to recognize and produce meanings in the field. Furthermore, Gee proposes that we think of literacy as inherently connected to social practices. In fact, in the contemporary culture, articulate language (spoken, gestural, or written) is not the only important communication system. Nowadays, images, symbols, charts, diagrams, equations, artifacts and many other visual symbols play a particularly important role in our daily lives. For example, it is important to learn visual literacy to “read” the pictures in an advertisement. Furthermore, words and images are juxtaposed or integrated in many ways: in magazines, newspapers, textbooks, software, etc. Images take more space and have meanings that can be independent of the words in texts. In this sense, games are multimodal texts. They combine moving images and music with language.

Given the various forms of human activity in the complex society we live in, it becomes necessary to develop a new model of intelligence that allows us to embrace a pluralistic view of intelligence. Howard Gardner’s (1983) influential definition of intelligence was developed by means of a model of seven basic intelligences known as the theory of multiple intelligences (MI). MI represents a broader and more pragmatic view of human nature. The eight intelligences are defined as the following skills:

1) to use language with competence (linguistic),

2) to use logical reasoning in mathematics and science (logical-mathematical),

3) to perceive details of the visual-spatial world and to manipulate objects in mind (spatial),

4) to understand, create and enjoy music and musical concepts (musical),

5) to use the body skillfully (bodily-kinesthetic);

6) to recognize subtle aspects of the behavior of others and respond appropriately to them (interpersonal),

7 ) to understand the one’s own feelings (intrapersonal), and

8) to recognize patterns and differences in nature (naturalist).

These categories or intelligences represent elements that can be found in all cultures, namely music, words, logic, paintings, social interaction, physical expression, inner reflection and appreciation of nature. Thus, unlike a learning style, which is a general approach that the individual can apply equally to any content imaginable, intelligence, to Gardner, is a capability with its own processes that are geared to specific contents in the world (e.g., musical sounds or spatial patterns).

From this perspective, Gee (2003) and Gardner (1983) value the interplay between learning and skills present in everyday life (culture) of people. So when we think about the SD approach, as developed by Gee, we realized that the interaction between both theories, the SD of everyday life, the largest existing set – where the intelligences are located – encompasses the SD of games. Note that Gardner points out that one of the goals of his endeavor is to examine the educational implications of a theory of multiple intelligences. Considering that, Gee listed thirty-six learning principles present in games, and considering the importance and popularity of games in contemporary culture, it seems interesting to begin to investigate how the learning principles can relate to the multiple intelligences. So we discuss here some possibilities of association between these theories. To accomplish this, the question we want to take up is this: What can the learning principles built into good games could do for the development of multiple intelligences, which are so important to everyday life? In other words: What is the relationship between these semiotic domains? To answer this, we have used the following research methodology: literature review, research on websites, observation of games, construction of the model of interaction between the two learning proposals, and analysis of the model.

Gee describes thirty-six learning principles which can be found in games. It is noteworthy that not all learning principles listed by the author are necessarily found on a single game – there is the possibility that a game conveys one or more of these principles. The analysis shows that to develop one or more intelligences, the learner must be immersed in one or more semiotic domains which have the conditions and qualities needed to facilitate its development. For example: there is no use to an apprentice of a sport modality to have access to only one modality for the full development of his Bodily-Kinesthetic intelligence, he needs to have access to various sports, namely various sub semiotic domains which are part of the larger semiotic domain of the sports. Besides that, there are other extrinsic and intrinsic factors (motivation, injuries, and appropriate training materials, etc.) that are important to succeed in the entire domain, like a sport modality. Examples of several prominent athletes demonstrate this fact: Formula 1 drivers, MMA fighters and Olympic athletes. In this sense, our research shows the existence of a binomial unexcelled: without learning principles, there are no good games, while without the valorization of a domain in the semiotic domain of everyday life there is no way forward within that domain. Thus, multiple intelligences cannot be fully developed in certain cultural contexts and the learning principles are worthless in these contexts

Moreover, the Interpersonal intelligence is very important in learning. We found that it is associated to thirty of the thirty-six learning principles. The Interpersonal intelligence clearly arises from cooperative work, community involvement, simulations of large groups, dedication to social issues, etc. Precisely the importance of Interpersonal intelligence, as Gardner notes, has been reduced in the contemporary educational scene: the sensitivity to other individuals as individuals and the ability to collaborate with others are increasingly less important now than it did in the past. Thus, we believe that the results of the comparison between these theories put into question the ways we design and manage education in its various spheres. For this reason, we believe that further analysis of the intersection of the theories studied here may help us in both the use of games as a pedagogical proposal and in thinking about education.

The association between both theories seemed productive for us to reflect on games and learning in general. Firstly, it should be noted that not all games can promote all learning principles. This is because there are many factors in the semiotic domain of everyday life that can hinder learning and development of multiple intelligences. And this occurs even when the game conveys the learning principle or the basic conditions to develop them, which demonstrates a close association between the principles and intelligences.

Secondly, the Interpersonal intelligence is associated to thirty learning principles. This demonstrates the complexity of learning and consequently shows the challenges that contemporary education must face. In fact, the study of the interaction between the theories can help us think about new ways of teaching and learning inside and outside of school. It seems that the relevance of Gee’s is in highlighting the importance of games culturally and for learning, while Gardner’s learning theory emphasizes the necessity of favorable conditions (environment, mentors, cultural appreciation, etc.) for the development of skills. We should remember that skills or intelligences are valued differently between cultures.

We believe that good video games represent, in fact, opportunities for direct and indirect learning of content and skills in the semiotic domain of everyday life, given its intimate link to the majority of the intelligences.

Work cited

Howard Gardner. Frames of mind. The theory of multiple intelligences (New York: Basic Books, 1983).

James P. Gee. What video games have to teach us about learning and literacy (New York: Palgrave, 2003).

Role Of Robotics In The Progressive Education System For The 21st Century

With a specific end goal to instruct in the 21st century, educational institutes and instructors need to develop and keep up a student’s enthusiasm for the curriculum by demonstrating and inculcating skills to transfer bookish knowledge to the real-life applications.

Robotics – An Applied Science

Before we even begin to understand the need for inculcating Robotics in the Education System of today, we need to be thorough with what exactly a robot is.

A robot is a machine that can perform complex actions based on the programs fed to the computer. It can perform a series of tasks, replicate many human movements and functions, but is essentially unemotional.

About Robotics

Robotics is that branch of technology that encompasses the start to the end of a robot. It not only deals with the designing aspect of a Robot, but applies technology for the construction of the same, considers the aspects of its operation, and further application of the robots.

Robotics is not a fad; it is far from that. It is a gradual progression from the old-school contemporary education and is more of a phenomenon that allows an integrated approach to the knowledge of mathematics, science and other technological content.

In the fast-paced world today, Robotics allows emphasis on problem-based learning, encourages learning in groups and outlays perfect integration and application of knowledge.

Robotics And Student Connect

Realizing True Potential: Since Robotics is essentially an application-based study, it allows students across levels to learn on the go. They may also get to realize their potentials and seek assistance where they see an opportunity to build their career in the long run.

Taking New Roles: In an interactive classroom environment, while working on a robot, student teams interact with each other. Some come across to be great speakers, while others as great thinkers – virtually breathing life into thoughts. They can rather code, perform specialized tasks and additionally ensure the group remains focused.

Going Beyond the Books: Today, the Education system is focusing beyond the bookish knowledge and while students get interested in a new domain like Robotics, they will also get an opportunity to get involved and learn other interactive platforms like social media to spread a word about their word.

Theory to Application: As the students begin to see, the theoretical knowledge coming to life in the manner, they would want it to, where they have a role in the actual control. They begin to enjoy the power of control and subconsciously start excelling in the respective domains as well.

Stretching the Boundaries: It allows an opportunity for critical thinking in a steady and self-inspired way. The learners encounter fulfilling accomplishments immediately and can rapidly proceed to establish complicated programs and challenges in a robot.

Virtual Helpers Will Make Life Easier

I would like to bring your attention to a technological first. MellaniuM design has combined three separate 3D software applications and technologies (i.e., rendering, texturing, and importing into a 3D engine) to produce virtual realistic 3D environments and artifacts which can be explored. This method has been used to date to produce a 3D museum environment for the display of architectural concepts and models. In addition an industrially engineered furnace for the refining of zinc has been reproduced in exact detail that can be entered and examined to grasp the design, installation, and maintenance concepts.

Applications extend to all areas of work, play, and education. Accuracy to detail and perspective produces an experience which leaves a ‘need more’ sensation to anyone who ventures within a virtual real world. Some people it has been rumored to have seen the ‘black monolith’. A sense of presence is apparent in the 3D environment and is achieved by extensive use of textures and sounds that are taken from the real world. It is predicted that the majority of the mundane tasks will be performed by virtual helpers inside the Virtual Real Worlds; leaving humans to do all the creative thinking.

This technology embraces all domains of life as we know it; virtual helpers will be provided with Artificial Intelligence specific to the users needs. Helpers will be behaviorally programmed together with having the physical realism of whomever we want. The uses of Virtual Real Worlds are endless; limited only by one’s imagination. The essential theme is that they shall be as real as possible.

No other company has offered 3D Virtual Reality on such an economical scale with the perspective and textual accuracy; this technology has momentous potential in the architectural, engineering, marketing, entertainment, and educational fields.

Concept Imagery and Cognition – No More IT

Meet Joe. “I can remember reading aloud in class and then not being able to answer the questions. Reading the words was no problem. (Shy smile.) But, then when I couldn’t answer the questions, the kids would laugh at me. (Looking down.) The worst was that I had a teacher in high school that continually called me stupid…maybe I am. (Long pause, brown eyes looking at me.) Am I?”

To this day my chest tightens remembering how Joe looked when he told that story. He was embarrassed and sensitive, and his problem with literacy wasn’t that he couldn’t decode the words, it was that he couldn’t comprehend the concepts. He could not get it, and telling him to “pay attention” or “think when you read” didn’t help him. It hurt him.

As Joe read or listened to language, he processed “parts”-the in-one-ear-and-out-the-other syndrome. He could sometimes remember a few details, but he couldn’t get the big picture. He had always had the problem, and it wasn’t just when he read. It was also when he tried to follow directions and could not remember all of them, and then got in trouble for not paying attention. It was when he tried to express himself, verbally or in writing, and it came out disjointed and out of sequence. It was when he listened to language, conversation or classroom presentations, and it went by him before he could get it. It was when he tried to participate in conversation and could not make salient points because he spoke to the “parts” he processed. It was when he tried to think critically or problem solve, a constant frustration for him. Though Joe could read and spell words, he had a language processing problem, and IT permeated the quality of his life and eroded his self-esteem.

Joe’s symptoms could be traced to his difficulty in getting the gestalt, the whole-necessary for processing language and thinking. Most importantly, his difficulty in getting the gestalt could be traced to his weakness in the sensory-cognitive function of concept imagery-the ability to visualize the whole.

Numerous years ago, while researching the relationship of imagery to comprehension and trying various steps to develop imagery, I discovered an interesting phenomena. It wasn’t that individuals couldn’t image, it was that they couldn’t image the gestalt. They could not connect the parts to form an imaged whole. Instead, they got “parts”-bits and pieces-and thus could not get the main idea, draw a conclusion, make an inference or evaluate.

This processing of parts instead of the gestalt contributes to a range of symptoms, most of which Joe had experienced:

· Weak reading comprehension

· Weak oral language comprehension

· Weak oral language expression

· Weak written language expression

· Difficulty following directions

· Difficulty with critical thinking

· Difficulty with problem solving

· Weak sense of humor

Unfortunately, weakness in concept imagery can be a hidden problem in the field of reading. It is often misdiagnosed, and it interferes with processing both oral and written language. Those of us who do not have the problem cannot know how painful it is. Individuals have told me that it means that you feel foggy, like when you go to sleep in a movie and then cannot put it altogether. They tell me that they have hidden the problem behind good social skills, noting when to smile appropriately in conversation or when to laugh at jokes they really didn’t get. They tell me that they go to tremendous lengths to cover this problem because most people just think they aren’t as bright or aren’t good listeners or communicators. A graduate from MIT told me that when he was in class trying to grasp a lecture, it was as if someone was going along with an eraser and erasing the language before he could get it.

The critical role of this function to cognition and the quality of life provokes some questions. One frequently asked me is whether or not this function can be developed and applied to higher order thinking skills? The answer is yes. Just as phonemic awareness can be developed and decoding and spelling established, an individual’s sensory system can be stimulated to image and process the gestalt-enabling the higher order thinking skills of main idea, conclusion, inference, prediction to be improved. Reasoning, logical thinking, problem solving, and perhaps even creativity can be developed.

Another question often asked me is whether or not weakness in concept imagery is increasing? Unfortunately, the answer seems to be yes. Scores from the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP) show continuing deficiencies in higher order reasoning skills. The NAEP found, as have other recent assessments, that problems in reading and expressing ideas in writing stem mainly from difficulty with verbal reasoning.

What might be contributing to this apparent decline? One answer is television, not because of the content television brings, but because of the process television denies. Since individuals do not have to image when watching television, imagery is not being stimulated, at least not like it was when story-telling, old radio shows, and reading for pleasure were our recreation.

As we process information through our sensory system, concept imagery brings the sensory information together enabling us to create the gestalt. And, the gestalt is a necessary piece for cognition. Furthermore, there is little question that imagery is directly related to cognition. Aristotle said, long before phonemic awareness was thought about, “It is impossible to think without a mental picture.”

Lastly, as I speak nationally and internationally to professionals about the role of sensory-cognitive functions in language processing, I am heartened by their enthusiastic response and improved awareness about reading. I have hope that we are entering the era of gestalt thinking in the field of reading, and consequently may be entering a time where we institute solutions-solutions that might eradicate learning problems for all individuals. No more Joes. No more IT.

The Purpose of Education – Creating Responsible, Productive Citizens

“The whole art of teaching is only the art of awakening the natural curiosity of young minds for the purpose of satisfying it afterwards”. – Anatole France

The purpose of education is to create responsible, productive and socially contributing citizens – people who can provide for their own families as well as contribute to their communities. As Toffler says, education in the 21st century should allow people to learn, unlearn and relearn. But I am not sure our schools and colleges are committed to this.

Education is one of the most unscientific human endeavors. You do well in school to get into a good college and earn a good degree. A good degree is supposed to be a passport to a good job. Based on your educational qualifications, you can climb to a reasonably high position without having to demonstrate any exceptional ability.

Beyond that, however, you may have problems. There is no established link between your performance in school and your performance in a job. Even more importantly, there is no link between your performance on the job and your performance in life.

To be true to purpose, education should support a child develop three fundamental capabilities:

1. Discover, develop and continually evolve a vision to become a useful member of society:

Many of us have an advantage – our parents envision our future for us, driving us to work towards achieving this vision. However, this is not as common among the poor. The education system has to step in to help everyone create this vision, and to build even the poor child’s confidence to pursue the vision.

Balaji Sampath, who runs Eureka Child – an NGO committed to improving literacy and math ability in government schools, told us a touching story in this context. Coming back from the US to do something meaningful in education, he immersed himself in local issues by spending a few months in a village. He was in a village classroom when a child asked the teacher whether it was possible to travel to the moon. “You and I cannot fly to the moon,” the teacher answered. “But scientists in the U.S. can…” We must stop robbing our children of goals and dreams.

2. Understand that questions are more important than answers:

Our education system places undue emphasis on providing answers – often to questions that children do not have. In other words, too often we teach children concepts without context; we need to show them why learning is important. We need to focus on awakening kids’ natural curiosity and teaching them to love learning. A good way to do this is to place children in natural experiences or in games where they can ask questions. In these settings, learning is immediate and strong. Learning can be a structured discovery process, offering students varied learning outcomes – just as our situations and decisions later in life offering different outcomes.

For example, an NGO in Mumbai went to schools with an experiment to teach students about water conservation. The pupils measured the amount of water consumed while brushing their teeth with the tap open, and then again with the tap off. Imagine, if we all learn this type of lesson in school, how we can apply the principles to so many other aspects of our home and work later in life.

3. Learning to Learn:

The world is evolving too fast for schools and colleges to keep up. What is being taught is inadequate and outdated, or will be soon. It is important that children are encouraged to discover answers on their own – through the Internet, through experimenting and by having access to experts on the cutting edge of every field.

It is important that students learn the scientific method –

(a) creating a hypothesis based on observations,

(b) designing and conducting experiments to prove or disprove these hypotheses and

(c) arriving at conclusions while recognizing that the conclusions could change with additional information.

With the level of knowledge available in the world today, it is also important to exercise judgment what to learn, and how and when you need to learn it. We need to teach kids when to rely on their own judgments,, and when to rely on the expertise of others. Our children must learn that even when you outsource the effort, you retain responsibility over the result.

What do you think? Do you agree with these ideas about the critical capabilities that our children need? Is our educational system addressing this? Do share your thoughts and experiences with all of us.